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Nina Goksun Say started using recyclable materials five years ago, grapping with images of the industrial world and creating a growing sense of environmental awareness. In her early work, she used found objects, broken parts of computers, and other electronic devices. Later, when she developed the idea of modern icons, she worked with smaller sizes and made use of media such as gold leaf, egg, tempera, wax, and wood; media used in icons of the early ages.



She was exposed to the finest examples of Byzantine icons in Istanbul where she grew up. In ‘modern icons’, she recognizes that the whole world is being controlled by computers, and asserts that computers have become the ones to the believed, trusted and worshipped.

 

Her Istanbul Show that opened in December 1994 was named "Belief, Death and Death of the Belief." It consisted of 90 modern icons (12"x12" each) exhibited in groups, making a reference to the Gestalt Theory which mainly deals with perception. According to Gestalt Psychology, images are perceived as a pattern or a whole rather than merely as a sum of distinct component parts.

Another idea came from the graveyards of the Latin World, where the tombs are installed in the walls like drawers. She combined the concepts of belief and death, exhibitin the modern icons in a pattern like the Latin graves with a shirne-like quality. In that installation, she also had a slide presentation of scenes with sound effects from New York, where she established her studio. With sights and sounds from an industrial society, she emphasized her materialist approach that today’s art is in a transformation paralleling the social and political developments in the "new world order", and that the aesthetic and moral values of individuals follow this change.

NINA GOKSUN SAY BIOGRAPHY PAGE

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